Should I buy a motorcycle?

Posted by on Oct 6, 2017 in Automobile Acidents | 0 comments

Am I the kind of guy who could pull off riding a motorcycle?

That’s the question I’m asking myself these days. Do I have it in me to be a rugged road warrior? Can I look good in black leather? Would I be willing to grow a paunch, get a Mom tattoo, grow an unreasonable beard and snarl at my fellow roadsters?

I’m looking to make a change in my life right now, something big. To date, nothing about me even whispers (let alone screams) “rebel.” I’ve never been a “take life by the haunches” sort of person. In fact, I’m the opposite. I’m careful. I got a good degree in school, and I worked almost full-time and put all my money towards my degree, so while m friends complain about the weight of student loan debts, I am debt free, because I’m careful.

Of course, those debt-ridden friends also spent time at parties and abroad and have low-paying put interesting jobs while I’m an accountant in a job I don’t despise, per se, but one which I have little actual interest in.

So, who made the better life choices here? I think the traditional choice would be me, the careful guy over here. I could be on a poster for mature life decisions at an early age. Now I’m approaching my mid-thirties, sometime in which I will official reach my middle expected age, I begin to question whether all that’s true.

Would I rather have my comfortable house and my comfortable car and my well-rated mortgage with little other debt to keep me up at night? Or would I rather have spent my twenties traveling, “finding myself,” and become a ballet dancer or joined a circus or something? What I’m missing in my well-ordered life is that spark of something crazy and daring, that moment when you run away from yourself just to turn around and take a good and proper look at what you left behind and what’s worth going back to and what’s best to leave forever.

I never did that. I wish I had.

Unfortunately, I’m not sure I have it in me. I certainly don’t have it in me to drop everything I have now and really change my life. I am as much a prisoner as an architect of my comfort now. I like it too much to risk it. I won’t quit my job. I won’t fly off for six months to Europe. (My God, the expense, I think to myself, and all those languages you don’t know! Then I faint.)

So, I’ve settled on the motorcycle. It’s like buying rebellion on the cheap. Just a leather jacket and a hog (are they all hogs? are some of them piglets?), and I’m transformed into someone with a more tolerable threshold for the carefree.

But then, I start thinking of the risk. The high number of accidents. The chance for injury at every turn.

Do I really have it in me? And even if I could get myself to buy one, won’t I just look like a fraud?

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Signs of Broker Fraud and Misconduct

Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Investment Fraud | 0 comments

In investing, it can be said that you technically don’t have full control of your money. You may lose money because of fluctuating investment values and investing on the wrong opportunities. That is understandable. But what is not understandable is losing money because of your broker’s fault, especially if it involves fraud and misconduct.

Those who have suffered from significant losses because of such things may have legal options. But of course, avoiding these brokers is the better choice, because you can save yourself from the hassles of courts and lost financial powers. Below are some of the signs you can look out for to know if your broker is going to put you in trouble.

He is not licensed

In tackling broker fraud and misconduct, the first thing you need to know is how legitimate this broker is. Maybe he doesn’t have the proper licenses to even sell securities and is actually just a scammer that wants to get a hold of your money. Do not be afraid to investigate about his legitimacy.

He has a history of misconduct

In your investigation, legitimacy is not the only important factor. Whether he is legitimate or not, you should check his history, other clients, and other associations to determine his reputation and how competent he is in what he does.

He has failed to study your status

A broker is obligated to look into your financial power, investment experience, and flexibility to risks, before even presenting an investing strategy for you. This is to make sure that your status is suitable to the kind of investment you are making.

He has failed to give you a suitable investing strategy

Even if he has studied your status as a potential investor, he can still put you in a financial loss if he recommends an investing strategy that does not fit your status and goals. This usually comes in the form of recommending investments that have higher risks than what you can financially tolerate.

He is shutting you out from relevant information

A good broker will let you know everything about your investments, but a fraudulent and malicious one will block everything that can expose his fraudulent and malicious nature and intention. Usually, these brokers speak too vaguely or technically to discourage you or make excuses whenever you demand specific documents.

 

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It is the Legal Duty of U.S. Employers to Provide for their Employees a Safe and Healthy Work Environment

Posted by on Mar 20, 2017 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

Private and government employers in the U.S. are obliged to provide their employees with a safe and healthy work environment to significantly reduce, if not totally eliminate, occurrences of accidents in the workplace. This duty is based on the mandate of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, a federal law that was enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1970. The Act requires the provision of a safe and healthy work environment for all employees, the conduction of training in the area of occupational health and safety, and the provision of vital information, research and education on the same area.

In 1971the Occupational Safety and Health Act or OSH Act gave birth to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which is tasked to fully and strictly implement all the safety standards mandated by the Act, such as a workplace free from mechanical dangers, excessive level of noise, heat or cold stress, exposure to toxic chemicals, poisonous gases, radiation, unsanitary conditions, and other hazards.

The Hazard Communication Standard or HCS, is another mandate that OSHA enforces. This federal mandate, which was passed into law in 1980 and took effect in 1986, gives those exposed to hazardous chemicals in the work area the right to be informed about the type of danger they are exposed to and how they can protect themselves from such danger.

The HCS, also known as the Right-to-Know law or the Worker Right-to-Know Legislation, also requires manufacturers and importers of hazardous substances to attach Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and warning labels on all their products. Aside from indicating on the label that a product is poisonous or hazardous, there should also be information on the product’s safe storage suggestions, potential health effects, precaution for use, emergency first aid instructions, and contact numbers for further information.

Each type of work environment presents a unique set of safety risks; thus, employers should take full responsibility in implementing the necessary measures that will prevent accidents from occurring. Anticipation of potential problems through risk assessment, safety training, provision of the necessary protective equipment, installation of safety barriers and so forth, are just few of the precautions that ought to be observed inside work premises. While OSHA maintains that accidents can be avoided, this will only be possible if owners of firms and their managers observe government safety standards, and the employees follow company safety rules.

It is explained by the firm Hach Rose Law that “A considerable number of different factors can contribute to making a work site unsafe for workers. Some of the most common of these include the following:

  • Lack of appropriate safety equipment or protocols
  • Failure to properly train employees
  • Unsafe ground conditions
  • Employment of unqualified workers
  • Faulty or damaged equipment

Risk of injuries is always highest in construction (and other industrial) sites than in any other type of work environment. Due to this, it is the duty of those in charge of running construction sites and the property on which the construction is taking place to ensure that the site is safe for workers and that workers are provided with adequate safety equipment, otherwise, they may be held accountable in the event that a worker is harmed while performing his or her job.”

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Hacked By SA3D HaCk3D

Posted by on Dec 29, 2016 in Sex Crimes | 0 comments

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by w4l3XzY3

Posted by on Oct 18, 2016 in Expunction | 0 comments

by w4l3XzY3

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